Howard Otway, revival movie theater

Howard Otway (1922 – 1994, an actor, author and singer owned and directed Theater 80 St. Marks, the longest continuously running movie house devoted exclusively to revival films and plays in New York City. His theater, at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village, began its film revival program in 1971 with an opening-night celebration at which Gloria Swanson was the host. Designed and built by Mr. Otway in 1966, the theater was previously the home of the Manhattan Festival Ballet and of theatrical productions that included the 1967 musical “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Mr. Otway began his… Read More

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George Holland, actor

George Holland (1791–1870) was an English American stage actor, born in London. He discovered the stage during a six weeks long vacation. It was at Astley’s Amphitheatre he made his first appearance and started a 53 year long career. He found work in Liverpool, Dublin and London and arrived on the stage in New York City in 1827. His first appearance in NYC was at the Bowery theater, aka the New York Theater. He acted in “A Day After the Fair,”  a hit and he traveled to many large cities in the USA with the acting troop. His work was always well reviewed and celebrated, but… Read More

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John Bunny, comedian, silent film star

John Bunny (September 21, 1863 – April 26, 1915) was an actor who was often described as “the first internationally recognized film comedian.” Between 1909 and his death in 1915, Bunny was one of the top stars of early silent film, as well as an early example of celebrity. Bunny was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn. The son of English immigrants, he initially worked as a clerk in a general store before joining a small minstrel show at the age of twenty. His stage career spanned over 30 years and included work in tour and stock theater companies around the US until he worked his way… Read More

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Judith Malina, living theater co-founder

Judith Malina co-founded the Living Theater with her husband in 1947 and they remained at the forefront of stage experimentation in the 1950s and 1960s. They were an integral part of the “Counter-culture” of the time. She was only 21 when they started the theater. She had studied acting and directing and remained involved in both throughout her life. Ms. Malina was born in Kiel, a port city in northern Germany, on June 4, 1926. The family moved to New York City when she was very young. She met Mr. Beck in 1943, when she was just 17, and together they attended… Read More

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