Historic, but not famous

James Batterson, sculpture, insurance agency founder

 James Goodwin Batterson (23 February 1823 in Bloomfield, Connecticut – 18 September 1901 in Hartford, Connecticut) was an American designer and builder, the owner of New England Granite Works from 1845 and a founder in 1863 of Travelers Insurance Company, both in Hartford, Connecticut. He introduced casualty insurance in the United States, for which he was posthumously inducted into the Insurance Hall of Fame (1965).

His real contribution to New York City is in the use of all that Granite and Stone. Before the Civil War he designed and built the monument to Gen. William J. Worth, New York City (1857). after the war Batterson supplied many cemetery and civil monuments. He also constructed the Masonic Temple in New York City, the Mutual Life Insurance Building, the Equitable Life Insurance Building, and the Alexander Hamilton statue in Central Park. Though his most important structure is not in NYC, he was the supplier of stone and general contractor for the Library of Congress in Washington D.C.. Most of the time he spent in NYC was as a builder and sculpture, but his contributions can be viewed daily by most visitors to Manhattan.

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Historic, but not famous

DrSamuel Bradhurst,  was born in 1749 and trained as a surgeon. During the American Revolution served at the Battles of Princeton and Brandy wine. In an encounter in mid-1777, while attending the wounded, he was captured by the British. It was then that he was placed under house arrest.

In 1799, he sold sixteen acres in Harlem Heights to Alexander Hamilton whose thirty-two acre estate would extend from what is now Hamilton Place on the west, to Hamilton Terrace on the east, and from 140′” to 147th Streets. Bradhurst was known as a friend to both Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. In an attempt to keep the two from dueling, Bradhurst challenged Burr to a duel, but both Bradhurst and Burr escaped unscathed.

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