Elizabeth Jackson Sands, mother, wife, farm manager, agent

Elizabeth Jackson Sands, mother, wife, farm manager and agent in an undercover munitions ring run from her Port Washington property, from the Battle of Brooklyn through to her daring contraband shipment run across the Long Island Sound. With the help of her friends, family, military contacts and slaves, she balanced taking care of her family, raising her crops and cows, and running a contraband munitions smuggling ring out of her cellar and backyard for the Continental Army. The Sands family was one of the original three families that settled in and owned what is now Sands Point, N.Y. Elizabeth married… Read More

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Margaret Cochran Corbin, first woman to get military pension in USA

Margaret Cochran Corbin (November 12, 1751 – January 16, 1800) was a woman who fought in the American Revolutionary War. On November 16, 1776, her husband, John Corbin was one of some 600 American soldiers defending Fort Washington in northern Manhattan from 4,000 attacking troops. Margaret decided she wanted to go with him. Since she was a nurse, she was allowed to accompany her husband as a nurse for the injured soldiers. When her husband was wounded in battle, she took his place and continued to work the cannon until she too was seriously wounded. Ms. Corbin later became the… Read More

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Dr. Samuel Bradhurst, tried to prevent Hamilton-Burr duel

Dr. Samuel Bradhurst,  was born in 1749 and trained as a surgeon. During the American Revolution served at the Battles of Princeton and Brandy wine. In an encounter in mid-1777, while attending the wounded, he was captured by the British. It was then that he was placed under house arrest. In 1799, he sold sixteen acres in Harlem Heights to Alexander Hamilton whose thirty-two acre estate would extend from what is now Hamilton Place on the west, to Hamilton Terrace on the east, and from 140′” to 147th Streets. Bradhurst was known as a friend to both Alexander Hamilton and Aaron… Read More

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Jacob Morton, major-general, marshal, Grand Master

Major-General Jacob Morton (1756–1837) was the marshal for the First inauguration of George Washington. When it was found that no bible was available, Morton retrieved the Lodge Bible from St. John’s Lodge where he was the Worshipful Master. Morton served as New York City Comptroller from 1807 to 1808. Morton was also later clerk for the New York City Common Council. Morton was an active Freemason, and was the Grand Master of Grand Lodge of New York from 1801–04. The Grand Lodge of New York established an award named for Morton known as the Jacob Morton Award, given to Masons… Read More

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James Rivington, journalist, publisher, spy?

James Rivington (1724 – July 1802) was an English-born American journalist who published a loyalist newspaper in the American colonies called Rivington’s Gazette. Some scholars in the 1950s determined that despite all outward appearances, Rivington was a member of the American Culper Spy Ring. Rivington was one of the sons of the bookseller and publisher Charles Rivington and inherited a share of his father’s business, which he lost at the Newmarket races. In 1760 he sailed to North America and resumed his occupation in Philadelphia. In 1761, he came to NYC and opened a print-shop at the foot of Wall… Read More

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