Stephen Pearl Andrews, anarchist, linguist, abolitionist

Stephen Pearl Andrews (1812 – May 21, 1886) was an anarchist, linguist, political philosopher, outspoken abolitionist, and author of several books on the labor movement and Individualist anarchism. He grew up in Massachusetts, moved to Louisiana at 19 to practice law, gave lectures on abolition in Texas and received death threats for him and his family because of them. He studied languages, claiming to speak no less than 35 and became an expert in shorthand. By the time he moved to New York City in the 1840s, his focus was on Utopian Societies. He became a devout individualist anarchist, became an Associate Fellow of the American Academy… Read More

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Hippolyte Havel, writer, anarchist

Hippolyte Havel (1871–1950) was a anarchist from Czechoslovakia. He was friends with Emma Goldman. He lived in Greenwich Village, which he declared to be “a spiritual zone of mind”. When young, he had been imprisoned by the Austria-Hungary government for his anarchistic activities and declared insane. He was imprisoned, eventually moved from the insane asylum to a regular prison and escaped to England. Ms. Goldman brought him to NYC. Mr. Havel was married to the anarchist Polly Holliday, who with him ran a restaurant on Washington Square in Greenwich Village frequented by radicals and artists. He worked there as a waiter, often calling customers “bourgeois… Read More

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Polly Holladay, restaurant owner, bohemian, anarchist

Polly Holladay was an radical and an anarchist born in Evanston, Illinois. When she moved to New York she quickly found her peers in the free-thinkers and bohemians of Greenwich Village. She established a restaurant in the basement of 137 MacDougal Street, where the Liberal Club, another popular incubator for artists and intellectuals, also operated. Polly’s Restaurant would move locations twice before eventually closing, but it never left the Village. In true bohemian fashion, the restaurant didn’t even have a formal name , it was often referred to it as “The Basement.” Locals knew it as “Polly’s Restaurant,” and they … Read More

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