Historic, but not famous

Guido Bruno, Bruno’s Garrett

Guido Bruno (1884–1942) was a well-known Greenwich Village character, and small press publisher and editor, sometimes called ‘the Barnum of Bohemia’. He emigrated to the United States from Prague as a second cabin class passenger under the name Kurt Kisch in December 1906. He was based at his “Garret on Washington Square” where for an admission fee tourists could observe “genuine Bohemian” artists at work. He staged “bohemian” working environments with painters, writers and models” and charged admission for the expectant visitors. He produced a series of little magazine publications from there and sold them to the tourists and others.

From July 1915 to December 1916, Bruno’s Weekly published poems, short stories, essays, illustrations and plays, as well as special sections, such as “Children’s House,” and “In Our Village.” His support for young unknown talent and his continuing battle for a freer American press were at the forefront of his work. He lost a lot of his own and others work,including unpublished manuscripts by Bernard Shaw and Mark Twain, when a fire tore through the building he lived at on Washington Square Park (no. 58) in 1916.

 

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Historic, but not famous

Romany Marie, Bohemian Cafe proprietor

Marie Marchand (May 17, 1885—February 20, 1961), known as Romany Marie, was a Greenwich Village restaurateur who played a key role in bohemianism from the early 1900s (decade) through the late 1950s in Manhattan. She arrived in New York City in 1901 from Romania. Her cafés were considered among the most interesting in New York’s Bohemia and had an extensive following. More salons than taverns, they were places for the interchange and pollination of ideas and compared to the cafes of Paris.

 

Marie’s “centers” for her “circle of thinking people” began in 1912 in a three-room apartment on St. Mark’s Place in the East Village and later in a rented house in The Bronx, before opening in Greenwich Village in 1914. The first location, rented in 1914 near Sheridan Square at 133 Washington Place on the third floor of a four-story building,  reached by climbing one outside staircase and two inside staircases. The Cafe had eleven locations over the years, all located in Greenwich and the West Village of Manhattan.

One of those locations was 49 Grove Street, next to the Thomas Paine building at 59 Grove home of Marie’s Crisis restaurant, now a piano bar, named for its owner Marie Du Mont and Paine’s Crisis pamphlet.

 

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