Guido Bruno, Bruno’s Garrett

Guido Bruno (1884–1942) was a well-known Greenwich Village character, and small press publisher and editor, sometimes called ‘the Barnum of Bohemia’. He emigrated to the United States from Prague as a second cabin class passenger under the name Kurt Kisch in December 1906. He was based at his “Garret on Washington Square” where for an admission fee tourists could observe “genuine Bohemian” artists at work. He staged “bohemian” working environments with painters, writers and models” and charged admission for the expectant visitors. He produced a series of little magazine publications from there and sold them to the tourists and others. From July 1915 to December 1916, Bruno’s Weekly published poems, short stories,… Read More

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Romany Marie, Bohemian Cafe proprietor

Marie Marchand (May 17, 1885—February 20, 1961), known as Romany Marie, was a Greenwich Village restaurateur who played a key role in bohemianism from the early 1900s (decade) through the late 1950s in Manhattan. She arrived in New York City in 1901 from Romania. Her cafés were considered among the most interesting in New York’s Bohemia and had an extensive following. More salons than taverns, they were places for the interchange and pollination of ideas and compared to the cafes of Paris.   Marie’s “centers” for her “circle of thinking people” began in 1912 in a three-room apartment on St. Mark’s Place in the East Village and later in a rented house in The Bronx, before opening… Read More

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