Dr. Alexander Skene, inventor of surgical instruments

Alexander Johnston Chalmers Skene (1837 – 1900) was a British gynecologist from Scotland who described what became known as Skene’s glands. He came to North America at the age of 19 to study. He began his studies in Toronto, continued in Michigan and and finally at the Long Island College Hospital (now the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center) in Brooklyn. He graduated in 1863 and began a career in the Army. After the army he entered private practice in Brooklyn and became a Professor of Disease of Women at Long Island College Hospital. He was professor of gynecology at the Medical School of New York in 1884,… Read More

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Janos Marton, Director of The Living Museum

Janos Marton was born in Hungary in 1949 and grew up a legacy of the Holocaust. His father, a dissident economist, was taken off to prison for six years on the day his son was born. In the 1960s the Martons received political asylum in Austria and moved to Vienna, where J anos attended high school and studied psychology. He began working with other doctors that used art work to communicate with mental patients while at the Landers Clinic near Vienna. In 1976, Dr. Marton received a Ph.D. in psychology and in 1980, a M.A. in fine arts at Columbia… Read More

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Dr. Samuel Bradhurst, tried to prevent Hamilton-Burr duel

Dr. Samuel Bradhurst,  was born in 1749 and trained as a surgeon. During the American Revolution served at the Battles of Princeton and Brandy wine. In an encounter in mid-1777, while attending the wounded, he was captured by the British. It was then that he was placed under house arrest. In 1799, he sold sixteen acres in Harlem Heights to Alexander Hamilton whose thirty-two acre estate would extend from what is now Hamilton Place on the west, to Hamilton Terrace on the east, and from 140′” to 147th Streets. Bradhurst was known as a friend to both Alexander Hamilton and Aaron… Read More

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Dr. John Charlton, fought for licensing of medical doctors

Dr. John Charlton (1731-1801), was a celebrated English surgeon who arrived in New York with British troops during the Revolutionary War. Following England’s defeat, Charlton remained in the newly independent colonies and became the president of the Medical Society of the State of New York. The organization  began in 1749 and  struggled through the Revolutionary period due to poor organization. In 1794, Charlton reorganized the group, and by 1796, the Society had begun to influence local and state health policy. As president of the Society, Dr. Charlton fought for the inclusion of educational standards in the licensing requirements for medical… Read More

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