Edward “Monk” Eastman, gangster, war hero

Edward “Monk” Eastman (1875 – December 26, 1920) was a New York City gangster who founded and led the Eastman Gang, which became one of the most powerful street gangs in New York City and is considered to be one of the last of the 19th-century New York gangsters. His father was a civil war veteran who abandoned the family by the time Edward was 5 and he lived with his maternal grandparents, mother and siblings.   His first arrest was in 1898 and while in prison became part of the Allen Street Cadets. He was known for his messy… Read More

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Lew Baker – assassin of Bill the Butcher

Lew Baker was a patrolman in the New York Police Department who was simultaneously employed as a “slugger” for Tammany Hall. He was involved in voter intimidation and election fraud during the 1840s and 1850s. Mr. Baker was born in Wales, but emigrated to the United States in the 1840’s. He became a police officer and often battled against the Bowery Boys and other gangs in NYC that were anti-immigrant. He is most remembered however as the assassin of William “Bill the Butcher” Poole. Mr. Poole was portrayed by Daniel Day Lewis in the film “Gangs of New York”, though… Read More

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Rev. Charles Henry Parkhurst

Rev. Charles Henry Parkhurst (April 17, 1842 – September 8, 1933) was an American clergyman and social reformer. He preached two sermons in 1892 in which he attacked the political corruption of New York City government. Backed by the evidence he collected, his statements led to both the exposure of Tammany Hall and to subsequent social and political reforms. He served at the Madison Square Presbyterian Church in New York City, from 1880 to 1918. Interested in municipal affairs, Parkhurst was elected president of the Society for the Prevention of Crime in 1891, and he challenged the methods of the… Read More

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