William Hooker, surveyor and engraver

William Hooker was a surveyor and engraver. He mapped early 1800s NY. He published maps of New York City in 1824. In 1827 he published the Pocket Plan of 1827, map of Brooklyn. His map was the first to have the AME (African Methodist Episcopal) Church on High Street, established in 1818, the oldest African American church in Brooklyn. His map highlighted points of interest in Brooklyn, including not only the Places of Worship like AME, but libraries, schools, markets, banks, insurance companies, lodges, gardens, and hotels. Mr. Hooker’s published maps of Manhattan (then just known as New York City)  still… Read More

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John Eberson, theater designer and owner

John Adolph Emil Eberson (1875–1954) was a European born American architect best known for the development and promotion of movie palace designs. He was born in Austria-Hungary and studied electrical engineering at The University of Vienna. In 1901, he traveled to the United States through NYC, but ended up in St. Louis. He started as an engineer with a small company, but eventually joined with Johnson Realty and Construction Company, a theatre architecture and construction company. Eberson and Johnson traveled around the eastern part of America, promoting opera houses in small towns. Once the town was persuaded to build an opera house, Eberson would… Read More

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Malvina Cornell Hoffman, sculptor

Malvina Cornell Hoffman (June 15, 1885 – July 10, 1966) was an American sculptor and author, well known for her life-size bronze sculptures of people. She also worked in plaster and marble. Hoffman created portrait busts of working-class people and significant individuals. She was particularly known for her sculptures of dancers, such as Anna Pavlova. She often cast her own work and wrote a book “Sculpture Inside and Out” on the technique of casting in bronze. She was born in NYC and named after an aunt who survived the sinking of the Titanic. Ms. Hoffman studied under many painters and… Read More

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Ah Ken, first man to immigrate to Chinatown

Ah Ken (1858–1896). First man to permanently immigrate to Manhattan’s Chinatown in the 1850’s, although Quimbo Appo is claimed to have arrived in the area during the 1840s. Mr. Ken initially peddled cigars outside of the fence at City Hall and eventually ran a cigar store on Park Row. He began a monopoly on cigars in the Chinatown area. It is also believed that he ran a boarding house for new Chinese immigrants arriving to NYC. Please follow and like us:

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Samuel Jones, lawyer, politician, Father of the New York Bar

Samuel Jones (July 26, 1734 – November 21, 1819) was an American lawyer and politician. Great Jones Street in NoHo in Manhattan is named for him. He is considered “The Father of The New York Bar” due to his work on revising New York State’s statutes in 1789 along with Richard Varick, who had a street in SoHo named after him. Jones was a member from Queens County of the New York State Assembly from 1786 to 1790. He was elected a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1788, but did not attend the session. He was Recorder of New York City from 1789 to 1797. He was a… Read More

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Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal is possibly one of the most beautiful interiors in NYC.  It covers 48 acres and has 44 platforms, more than any other railroad station in the world. The first building opened in 1871, the current Beaux-Arts style building was completed in 1913. The building was proposed to be town down to make way for more office tours, but was luckily saved through the efforts of many citizens of NYC including Jackie Kennedy. Today this building stands as one of the great landmarks in this city. You can do so much more than just take a train to Connecticut or Upstate… Read More

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