Ah Ken, first man to immigrate to Chinatown

Ah Ken (1858–1896). First man to permanently immigrate to Manhattan’s Chinatown in the 1850’s, although Quimbo Appo is claimed to have arrived in the area during the 1840s. Mr. Ken initially peddled cigars outside of the fence at City Hall and eventually ran a cigar store on Park Row. He began a monopoly on cigars in the Chinatown area. It is also believed that he ran a boarding house for new Chinese immigrants arriving to NYC. Please follow and like us:

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Samuel Jones, lawyer, politician, Father of the New York Bar

Samuel Jones (July 26, 1734 – November 21, 1819) was an American lawyer and politician. Great Jones Street in NoHo in Manhattan is named for him. He is considered “The Father of The New York Bar” due to his work on revising New York State’s statutes in 1789 along with Richard Varick, who had a street in SoHo named after him. Jones was a member from Queens County of the New York State Assembly from 1786 to 1790. He was elected a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1788, but did not attend the session. He was Recorder of New York City from 1789 to 1797. He was a… Read More

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Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal is possibly one of the most beautiful interiors in NYC.  It covers 48 acres and has 44 platforms, more than any other railroad station in the world. The first building opened in 1871, the current Beaux-Arts style building was completed in 1913. The building was proposed to be town down to make way for more office tours, but was luckily saved through the efforts of many citizens of NYC including Jackie Kennedy. Today this building stands as one of the great landmarks in this city. You can do so much more than just take a train to Connecticut or Upstate… Read More

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Hearst Tower

The Hearst corporation has been around since 1887, growing from newspapers to magazines and television. The headquarters in NYC was originally built in 1928 at a cost of $2 million. This original building was saved and a newer 46 story headquarters built inside of it in 2008. The Hearst headquarters was one of the first “green” office buildings in NYC. The floor of the atrium is paved with heat conductive limestone. Tubing is embedded under the floor and filled with circulating water for cooling in the summer and heating in the winter. Rain collected on the roof is used in the cooling system,… Read More

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Alphabet City Walking Tour

Years ago Alphabet City was considered dangerous but today it is a mix of affluent New Yorkers, NYU students, artists, musicians and free spirits. Alphabet City is the area from 14th Street to Houston Street, and from Avenue A to Avenue D in New York’s East Village. Before it was bustling with buildings, this area was marsh. In the 1800’s developers began building apartments and a large German community sprang up. By the early 20th century the area became more diverse with Jewish, Irish and Italian immigrants making this area their home. During the 1980s, Alphabet City was home to a mix of Puerto Rican and African… Read More

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The Dorilton Apartment Building – Parisian Luxury in the Upper West Side

Wouldn’t we all love to have large sound-proof rooms? That’s what attracted many artists and musicians to The Dorilton when it was completed in 1902. The Dorilton is an excellent example of Beaux Arts architecture on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, and it is included in the National Register of Historic Places. It was restored in 1998 and no one can pass by without noticing the beauty of its façade and majestic sculptural decorations. We Can Tour That can take you there on the way to other off-the-beaten-path and breathtaking locations on the Upper West Side. Contact us: wecantourthat.com… Read More

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