Historic, but not famous

Barnett Baff was a poultry dealer, murdered on November 24, 1914 by an organized crime syndicate that represented the “poultry trust”. The trust extorted $10 per truckload of poultry from merchants.  Baff’s death led to an investigation of organized crime in New York City and led to the resignation of Captain John McClintock, the deputy Police Commissioner.

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Historic, but not famous

Maria Hernandez lived in Bushwick Brooklyn and fought against drug dealers in the neighborhood. Maria was born in Brooklyn in 1953 and lived in Bushwick until 1989. She was educated at public schools in the borough and went to New York University for Accounting.

Maria Hernandez and her husband tried to evict drug dealers from her neighborhood of Bushwick. They tried to stop them by rallying support for their efforts and educating her neighbors about the need to evict the drug dealers. She organized block parties and community gatherings.

On August 8, 1989 Maria was shot 5 times through her window in her apartment on Starr Street, later dying of her wounds. Due to her brave and committed role in the community, the park in Bushwick was renamed in her honor. Her efforts have made a real difference in the Bushwick neighborhood which is now considered a very desirable place to live.

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Historic, but not famous

David Lamar (1877 – January 12, 1934) was a con man known as the Wolf of Wall Street. In 1899, Lamar claimed one of his most famous victims, 25-year-old John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Working through George Rogers, secretary to Standard Oil founder John D. Rockefeller, Sr., Lamar convinced the younger Rockefeller to buy stock in U.S. Leather, using money he had borrowed from his father. As Rockefeller Jr. was buying, Lamar was selling, and the younger Rockefeller lost nearly $1 million.

In 1913 Lamar was under indictment in New York and was charged with impersonating a member of Congress. While working for the German Navy intelligence organization in 1915, he promoted strikes and work slowdowns in munitions plants by means of the Labor’s National Peace Council. He testified before congress for many of his schemes and a sealed enditement was eventually delivered.

Mr. Lamar was known for using intimidation and violence against people scheduled to testify against him on the many cases that were brought against him including the beating of James McMahon, a coachman for Mr. Lamar, on the courthouse steps.

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