Historic, but not famous

Holly Beye, reporter, writer, civil rights advocate

Holly Beye (1922 – 2011) was a graduate of Swarthmore College and moved to New York City and became a reporter at PM, the left wing newspaper started by Marshall Field, although her intent was to write fiction, poetry and drama.

In 1946, she married David Ruff and they lived at 120 Charles Street in Greenwich Village, which became the title of her published journal of the life of a struggling artist in the 40’s, published in 2006. She eventually moved to San Francisco and then Woodstock in upstate New York. In Woodstock, she began to write more dramatic work. Her plays appeared at the Woodstock Playhouse “Afternoon of the Spawn” 1961, La Galleria at Cafe La Mama in NYC “Clean” 1995, the Vandam Theatre in NYC “It’s All Yours” 1963 and the Playhouse in San Francisco “The White Angel” 1965.

At the same time she created a satire performing improv ensemble, initially called “Holly’s Comets”. The group enjoyed local and regional success and even went on tour a couple of times. It proved an outlet for a number of retired people to expression to their lives. Ms. Beye worked tirelessly in the sixties for the Civil Rights movements, helping to organize protest and pickets in Kingston and throughout the Woodstock area.

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Historic, but not famous

Oliver Dyer (April 26, 1824 – January 13, 1907) was an American journalist, author, teacher, lawyer and stenographer. He invented a shorthand system that was the first widely used stenography system in the United States. He developed the system to make it easier for him to take notes during political conventions and interviews. He eventually became the first Congressional shorthand reporter.

Dyer also had a successful career as a columnist for a number of popular publications, such as the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, New York Ledger and The Sun, during the 1850s and 60s. He was prominent among the reformers who campaigned against the various saloons, clubs and other “immoral establishments” of New York’s underworld. His 1868 expose of John Allen caused the saloon keeper to become infamously known as “the wickedest man in New York” and forced to close his dance hall.

Mr. Dyer died in 1907 from Bronchitis.

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