Barney Gallant, restaurant owner

Barney Gallant was the first person in NYC arrested for serving alcohol during prohibition in 1919. He owned the Greenwich Village Inn and took full responsibility for the serving of alcohol during a raid to prevent his waiters from being arrested. He spent 30 days in The Tombs, the notorious jail in the city. His arrest made him an immediate celebrity. Gallant went on to open swanky speakeasies and nightclubs, popular among locals and visitors from uptown alike. The names of his venues include Club Gallant, Barney’s, and Speako de Luxe. His clubs were known for the exclusivity. Originally from… Read More

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Anthony Mazzarella, Waterfront Crabhouse owner

Anthony Mazzarella (1938-2015) opened the Waterfront Crabhouse in Long Island City Queens in the 1970s. The restaurant, located on Borden Ave in a building dating back to the 1800s, was known for its seafood dishes and walls decorated with boxing memorabilia.   Besides the restaurant, Mr. Mazzarella was also know for his charity events.  He served as a member of the American Cancer Society and Queens Division, and he founded the Patty Fund for Childhood Cancer. He started an annual block party on the Fourth of July that raised thousands of dollars for cancer patients. Other events were held at the Crab House,… Read More

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Thomas Healy, nightclub proprietor

Thomas Healy owned Healy’s near current Columbus Circle in the early 1900s. Healy’s was one of the busiest clubs in the area with a spacious dining and dance floor. It featured an indoor ice-skating rink and enormous ballroom and more. It was one of New York’s most trendy dining palaces in 1913. At 1 a.m. on August 13, 1913,  the police burst into Healy’s and violently threw out all the patrons. The problem began days earlier when Mayor Gaynor initiated the Cafe Curfew for the wild lobster palaces and nightclubs that he felt were turning Midtown into an all-night party.  Establishments holding proper liquor licenses… Read More

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