Thomas M. Mulry, businessman, banker

Thomas M. Mulry was born in New York City and his early school-days were spent in St. Joseph’s parochial school and then at De La Salle Academy.  In 1874, he joined the St. Vincent de Paul Society, an international organization of Catholic laymen dedicated to helping the poor. A successful businessman and banker, he devoted extensive time and resources to charitable work. On October 6, 1880 he was married to Mary E. Gallagher and they set up a home in Greenwich Village. Mulry became a director and for ten years president of the Emigrant Industrial Saving Bank, the largest institution… Read More

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Philip H. Martiny, sculptor

Philip H. Martiny (Alsace, 19 May 1858 – 1927) was a Franco-American sculptor who worked in the Paris atelier of Eugene Dock, where he became foreman before emigrating to New York in 1878—to avoid being drafted into the French army. In the US he often worked in cooperation with architects in Beaux-Arts architecture. He had a sculpture studio in McDougal Alley, a former mews behind Washington Square Park. Much of his work is in New York City, though he provided bas-reliefs for the Art Institute of Chicago and for government buildings in Washington, DC. Though he was a member of… Read More

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Big Tom Foley

Big Tom Foley (1852-1925) was a Tammany Hall district leader and saloon owner. Foley used his Tammany Hall political connections to help win the governorship of New York for fellow Irishman Al Smith, and later backed Smith’s unsuccessful bid for the presidency. Mr. Foley has become a controversial figure because of his Tammany Hall connection, but does have Foley Square (the site of his last saloon and political gathering place) where the court houses and Federal Building sit in downtown Manhattan named after him.   He left school at age 13 to support his widowed mother, working for a time… Read More

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