Augustus Ludlow, War of 1812

Augustus C. Ludlow (1 January 1792 – 13 June 1813) was an officer in the United States Navy during the War of 1812. He was born in Newburgh, New York and was appointed midshipman when he was 12. He received a commission to be a lieutenant at age 18. Ludlow was second in command to Captain James Lawrence on the USS Chesapeake during the ship’s engagement with HMS Shannon on June 1, 1813. It was to Ludlow that Lawrence said “Don’t give up the ship.” Both Ludlow and Lawrence were mortally wounded in that battle, and Ludlow died in Halifax, Nova Scotia on June 13, 1813. Lieutenant Ludlow was buried together with Captain James Lawrence and Lawrence’s widow, in the… Read More

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David Bates Douglass, landscape architect, Green-Wood cemetery

David Bates Douglass (March 21, 1790 – October 21, 1849) was a civil and military engineer, who worked on a broad set of projects throughout his career. He was an instructor/professor at The US Military Academy, Kenyon and Hobart Colleges. Born in New Jersey, he graduated from Yale University, fought in the War of 1812, consulted on the Erie Canal’s western end, and designed the  Montville inclined plane on the Morris Canal across the Northern area of New Jersey. Most New Yorkers enjoy Mr. Douglass’ work at the Green-Wood Cemetery. The sprawling, natural landscape and one of the highest points in Brooklyn (200… Read More

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Jacob Morton, major-general, marshal, Grand Master

Major-General Jacob Morton (1756–1837) was the marshal for the First inauguration of George Washington. When it was found that no bible was available, Morton retrieved the Lodge Bible from St. John’s Lodge where he was the Worshipful Master. Morton served as New York City Comptroller from 1807 to 1808. Morton was also later clerk for the New York City Common Council. Morton was an active Freemason, and was the Grand Master of Grand Lodge of New York from 1801–04. The Grand Lodge of New York established an award named for Morton known as the Jacob Morton Award, given to Masons… Read More

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